Indicator Details — Children and Adolescents: Prevalence of Restless Leg Syndrome Among Childrena
Data Sources
 
Stratification and Year Choices:

  Source
  • Atlanta Pediatric Clinics

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  Chart Format


Published literature or one-time analysis, ongoing surveillance not available Published literature or one-time analysis, ongoing surveillance not available

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Footnotes:
a The difference in the prevalence of RLS between children with CKD and healthy children has a p-value of 0.04.




The prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) was significantly higher in children with CKD than in healthy children (15.3% vs. 5.9%; P= 0.04).
Chart Explanation: The prevalence of RLS was determined for a cohort of both healthy children and those with CKD. The prevalence of RLS was significantly higher in children with CKD than in healthy children (15.3% vs. 5.9%; P= 0.04). RLS was defined using criteria from the National Institutes of Health and was assessed using a diagnostic questionnaire that accounted for the exclusion of mimics. The healthy patients were from two pediatric practices in Atlanta and the pediatric CKD patients were recruited from outpatient clinics at Children’s Health Care of Atlanta.
A cross-sectional cohort study comprises children aged 8 to 18 years, living in the the metropolitan area of Atlanta. The control participants were recruited from two pediatric practices in Atlanta, while the participants with CKD were recruited from outpatient clinics and the hemodialysis unit at Children’s Health Care of Atlanta. The goal of the study was to compare the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) between children with CKD and healthy controls. Participants in the CKD group had either a functioning transplant, were on dialysis, or had an eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

This indicator is based upon analysis in published literature: Riar SK, Leu RM, Turner-Green TC, et al. Restless legs syndrome in children with chronic kidney disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2013;28(5):773-795.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23334386
FieldData
Description of MeasurePrevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS)
Data SourceAtlanta pediatric clinics and the hemodialysis unit at Children's Health Care of Atlanta
Type of Data SourcePrivate
Data SetChildren aged 8 to 18 years, living in the the metropolitan area of Atlanta; the control participants were recruited from two pediatric practices in Atlanta, while the participants with CKD were recruited from outpatient clinics and the hemodialysis unit at Children’s Health Care of Atlanta
Health Care Data SystemNo
Regional or National?Regional
Demographic groupChildren aged 8 to 18 years, living in the the metropolitan area of Atlanta: 85 control participants from two pediatric practices in Atlanta; 124 participants with CKD recruited from outpatient clinics and the hemodialysis unit at Children’s Health Care of Atlanta.
NumeratorAll participants with restless legs syndrome
DenominatorAll participants
Definition of CKDeGFR of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2; cases also included patients with a functioning kidney transplant, patients receiving peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis
Primary Data Source IndicatorPrevalence of RLS
Primary Indicator Method of MeasurementAn RLS diagnostic questionnaire that was developed using the NIH consensus guidelines; pediatric questions were incoporated from the Peds REST study. 
Secondary Data Source IndicatorPresence of CKD
Secondary Indicator Method of MeasurementUsed eGFR values previously entered in patients' medical records
Frequency of Measurement (Primary)Once 
Period Currently Available2012
Pending DataNone
U.S. Regions Covered by Primary VariableCommunities in Atlanta, Georgia
Additional Data Items of InterestStratification variables of interest (BMI, age, race, gender, stage of CKD)
Limitations of IndicatorSmall sample size may have led to false-negative results; gender and racial differences between the control and patient populations
Analytical ConsiderationsCases and controls were well-matched for age
References and Sources:
Suggested Citation:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Kidney Disease Surveillance System—United States.
website. http://www.cdc.gov/ckd