Indicator Details: Total Estimated and Projected Population in the United States
Data Sources
 
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  Source
  • U.S. Census

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Although all age groups are expected to continue growing, the number of persons aged ≥60 years is expected to nearly double, from 57 to 109 million between 2010 and 2050.

The U.S. population was 309 million in 2010; by 2050, the U.S. population is estimated to be greater than 400 million persons.
Chart Explanation: According to the U.S. Census, the total U.S. population in 2010 was 308,745,538; by 2050, the population is expected to be 419,853,587. While the total populations of all age groups are all expected to grow over time, the rates of growth are expected to be much higher in the older age groups. From 2010 to 2050, the expected number of U.S. residents aged 60-69 years old is expected to increase from 29.3 to 42.8 million and the number aged ≥70 years old is expected to increase from 42.8 to 66.3 million.
As with most chronic diseases, increased age is a well-known and powerful risk factor for the development of CKD (National Kidney Foundation, http://www.kidney.org/kidneydisease/ckd/index.cfm); consequently, prevalence of CKD is highest among older Americans (Coresh et al., 2007). Additionally, U.S. incidence of ESRD is highest among older adults (United States Renal Data System, 2011). Although age is not modifiable, it remains important for a U.S. CKD surveillance system to estimate the proportions of the population who will be among the older age (i.e., higher-risk) groups for both incidence and progress, as the U.S. population changes over time. The U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov) conducts a decennial population census, as mandated by the U.S. Constitution to guide apportionment of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Census 2000 and Census 2010 contained items regarding age, gender, race, Hispanic/Latino origin, and housing characteristics and was administered to the entire resident population of the United States. From the data collected, both population estimates (www.factfinder2.com) and projections (United States Census Bureau, 2008; http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/index.html) are available publicly.

As with most chronic diseases, increased age is a well-known and powerful risk factor for the development of CKD (National Kidney Foundation, http://www.kidney.org/kidneydisease/ckd/index.cfm); consequently, prevalence of CKD is highest among older Americans (Coresh et al., 2007). Additionally, U.S. incidence of ESRD is highest among older adults (United States Renal Data System, 2011). Although age is not modifiable, it remains important for a U.S. CKD surveillance system to estimate the proportions of the population who will be among the older age (i.e., higher-risk) groups for both incidence and progress, as the U.S. population changes over time. The U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov) conducts a decennial population census, as mandated by the U.S. Constitution to guide apportionment of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Census 2000 and Census 2010 contained items regarding age, gender, race, Hispanic/Latino origin, and housing characteristics and was administered to the entire resident population of the United States. From the data collected, both population estimates (www.factfinder2.com) and projections (United States Census Bureau, 2008; http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/index.html)are available publicly.
FieldData
Description of MeasureAge in the general population
Data SourceUnited States Census
Type of Data SourcePublic
Data SetU.S. estimates/projections 2000-2050
Health Care System DataNo
Regional or National?National
Demographic GroupAll U.S. residents
NumeratorNumber of U.S. residents in defined age groups
DenominatorNumber of all U.S. residents
Primary Data Source IndicatorAge (in years)
Primary Indicator Method of MeasurementQuestionnaire (census-taking)
Secondary (1) VariableRace/ethnicity
Secondary (1) Indicator Method of MeasurementQuestionnaire (census-taking)
Secondary (2) VariableGender
Secondary (2) Indicator Method of MeasurementQuestionnaire (census-taking)
Frequency of Measurement (Primary)Every 10 years (cross-sectional)
U.S. Region Covered by Primary VariableAll
Period Currently Available2050
Pending Data2010 projections, 2020 estimates
Additional Data Items of InterestProjections of U.S. population by demographic group through 2050
Limitations of IndicatorSelf-reported race/ethnicity; projections associated with some amount of error
Analytic ConsiderationsAge groups are reported in 1-year intervals and can be collapsed into any intervals; race/ethnicity must be examined separately, non-Hispanic white and Hispanic white should be separated
References and Sources:
  • Coresh J, Selvin E, Stevens LA, et al. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the United States. JAMA. 2007;298(17):2038-47.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17986697
  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. USRDS 2011 Annual Data Report: Atlas of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease in the United States, Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health; 2011.
    https://www.usrds.org/reference.aspx
  • Hollmann FW, Mulder TJ, Kallan JE. Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau. Methodology and Assumptions for the Population Projections of the United States: 1999 to 2100. Population Division Working Paper No. 38; January 2000.
    http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0038.pdf
Suggested Citation:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Kidney Disease Surveillance System—United States.
website. http://www.cdc.gov/ckd